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July 2012

EDGAR DEGAS ~ THE MYSTERY OF A PAINTING

in Art & the Unconscious Mind/Passion Of Art by
Degas

A painting requires a little mystery, some vagueness, and some fantasy. When you always make your meaning perfectly plain you end up boring people.

Edgar Degas

Self portrait 1855

PAUL CEZANNE ~ FEELINGS & ART

in Just a bit of everything and everyone.../Passion Of Art by
paulcezanne

An art which isn’t based on feeling isn’t an art at all… feeling is the principle, the beginning and the end; craft, objective, technique – all these are in the middle.

Paul Cezanne

Photo: Cezanne in his studio, 1904

PAUL CEZANNE ~ FEELINGS & ART

in Just a bit of everything and everyone.../Passion Of Art by
paulcezanne

An art which isn’t based on feeling isn’t an art at all… feeling is the principle, the beginning and the end; craft, objective, technique – all these are in the middle.

Paul Cezanne

Photo: Cezanne in his studio, 1904

JAMES BALDWIN ~ THE VALUE OF READING

in The words that make sense... brilliant writings by writers... by
jamesbaldwin

“You think your pain and your heartbreak are unprecedented in the history of the world, but then you read. It was books that taught me that the things that tormented me most were the very things that connected me with all the people who were alive, or who had ever been alive.”

― James Baldwin

TAMARA DE LEMPICKA ~ GLAMOUR STAR

in Muses in a Surreal World by
Tamara_de_Lempicka

…for my inspiration…I liked to go out in the evenings…

and have a good-looking man tell me how beautiful I am

or how great an artist I am –

and he touches my hand … I loved it! – I needed that.

And I had many, many.”

Tamara de Lempicka

Tamara de Lempicka (Łempicka) (16 May 1898 – 18 March 1980), born Maria Górska in Warsaw, Poland, was a Polish Art Deco painter and “the first woman artist to be a glamour star”.

SOREN KIERKEGAARD ~ ON PASSION

in Art & the Unconscious Mind by
soren

It is really curious how men, whom I otherwise look upon as honest, and who in other respects are not my enemies, lie monstrously, and are hardly conscious of it themselves, when they really get into a passion. Passion has an extraordinary power. How foolish, then, is the modern seeking after system upon system, as though help was to be found there; no, passion must be purified.

Soren Kierkegaard’s Journal, 1846

ALEKSANDR SOLZHENITSYN ~ THE IMPORTANCE OF EXPERIENCE….

in The words that make sense... brilliant writings by writers... by
Solzhenitsyn

“Own only what you can always carry with you: know languages, know countries, know people. Let your memory be your travel bag.”
― Aleksandr I. Solzhenitsyn

Aleksandr Isayevich Solzhenitsyn ; 11 December 1918 – 3 August 2008) was a writer, who, through his often-suppressed writings, helped to raise global awareness of the gulag, the Soviet Union’s forced labor camp system – particularly in The Gulag Archipelago and One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich, two of his best-known works. Solzhenitsyn was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1970. He was expelled from the Soviet Union in 1974 but returned to Russia in 1994 after the Soviet system had collapsed

AKOSAH KWADWO ~ THE HEART IS NOT YET SWEET

in Poetry of Art by
a_summer_night-large

And then we added the colors in the rain

The hundred pins in the skeletons of dust

In the dawn and evening

Of the wedding of mourning

In the earth of the harsh country

But if the sun falls

Within you in the years

And the heart is not yet sweet

Let no one touch it

In the how many years of the sun…

Akosah Kwadwo
2012

Painting is A Summer Night, 1890 by Winslow Homer

DANIIL KHARMS ~ ON POETRY

in Poetry of Art by
charms

“One must write poetry in such as way that if one threw the poem in a window, the pane would break.”
― Daniil Kharms
(1905-1942)
Daniil Ivanovich Yuvachev(Даниил Иванович Юёв) was born in St. Petersburg, into the family of Ivan Yuvachev, a well known member of the revolutionary group, The People’s Will. By this time the elder Yuvachev had already been imprisoned for his involvement in subversive acts against the tsar Alexander III and had become a religious philosopher, acquaintance of Anton Chekhov during the latter’s trip to Sakhalin.

Daniil invented the pseudonym Kharms while attending high school at the prestigious German “Peterschule”. While at the Peterschule, he learned the rudiments of both English and German, and it may have been the English “harm” and “charm” that he incorporated into “Kharms”.rs. It is rumored that he scribbled the name Kharms directly into his passport.

In 1924, he entered the Leningrad Electrotechnicum, from which he was expelled for “lack of activity in social activities”. After his expulsion, he gave himself over entirely to literature. He joined the circle of Aleksandr Tufanov, a sound-poet, and follower of Velemir Khlebnikov’s ideas of zaum (or trans-sense) poetry. He met the young poet Alexander Vvedensky at this time, and the two became close friends and inseparable collaborators.

In 1927, the Association of Writers of Children’s Literature was formed, and Kharms was invited to be a member. From 1928 until 1941, Kharms continually produced children’s works and had a great success.

In 1928, Daniil Kharms founded the avant-garde collective OBERIU, or Union of Real Art. He embraced the new movements of Russian Futurism laid out by his idols, Khlebnikov, Kazimir Malevich, and Igor Terentiev, among others. Their ideas served as a springboard. His aesthetic centered around a belief in the autonomy of art from real world rules and logic, and the intrinsic meaning to be found in objects and words outside of their practical function.

By the late 1920s, his antirational verse, nonlinear theatrical performances, and public displays of decadent and illogical behavior earned Kharms — who always dressed like an English dandy with a calabash pipe — the reputation of being a talented but highly eccentric “fool” or “crazy-man” in Leningrad cultural circles.

Even then, in the late 20s, despite rising criticism of the OBERIU performances and diatribes against the avant-garde in the press, Kharms nurtured a fantasy of uniting the progressive artists and writers of the time (Malevich, Filonov, Terentiev, Vladimir Mayakovsky, Kaverin, Zamyatin) with leading Russian Formalist critics (Tynianov, Shklovsky, Eikhenbaum, Ginzburg, etc.,) and a younger generation of writers (all from the OBERIU crowd—Alexander Vvedensky, Konstantin Vaginov, Nikolai Zabolotsky, Igor Bakhterev), to form a cohesive cultural movement of Left Art. Needless to say it didn’t happen that way.

Kharms was arrested in 1931 together with Vvedensky, Tufanov and some other writers, and was in exile from his hometown (forced to live in the city of Kursk) for most of a year. He was arrested as a member of “a group of anti-Soviet children’s writers”, and some of his works were used as an evidence. Soviet authorities, having become increasingly hostile toward the avant-garde in general, deemed Kharms’ writing for children anti-Soviet because of its absurd logic and its refusal to instill materialist and social Soviet values.

He continued to write for children’s magazines when he returned from exile, though his name would appear in the credits less often. His plans for more performances and plays were curtailed, the OBERIU disbanded, and Kharms receded into a very private writing life.

Source …Good Reads

MARK TWAIN ~ THE IDEAL LIFE

in The words that make sense... brilliant writings by writers... by
Samuel Clemens In Tophat

“Good friends, good books, and a sleepy conscience: this is the ideal life.”

Mark Twain

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